Learning with the Brain in Mind

  • 11 Jun 2015
  • 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM
  • Cultural Chemistry, 150 Dow St., Manchester, NH

Registration

  • Learning with the Brain in Mind: This training provides an overview of basic human brain learning roles based on recent research and theory. The instruction will help develop an understanding of mental traps that often interfere with looking at new and different ideas, development of effective learning approaches, and opportunities to create learning that sticks.
  • Non-members of ATD-NH

Registration is closed

Brain on Neon



This training provides an overview of basic human brain learning roles based on recent research and theory. The instruction will help develop an understanding of mental traps that often interfere with looking at new and different ideas, development of effective learning approaches, and opportunities to create learning that sticks.

Facilitator: Chuck Bagley

Chuck has a Master’s in Education in Adult Learning and Development from Plymouth State University (PSU), a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study (CAGS) in the Neurodevelopmental Approach to Teaching at PSU and is currently a doctoral student at PSU. He is an avid skier, cyclist, runner (plodder more like it) and hiker. He says he has always had a passion for learning though (as Winston Churchill once said) he doesn’t always like being taught.

He admits he has experienced some
real train wrecks in the education world particularly in public school, as an undergraduate learner and, unfortunately, more than a few vocational workshops. Therefore, he enjoys trying to figure out the best way to get good learning between the ears
of a learner.

Remembering and reciting the vocabulary words and concepts of a
topic represents only a superficial understanding of the subject. Barry Sheckley from the Neag School of Education at the University of Connecticut suggests, “Adult learning is about creating or re-creating experience.”

Real learning goes deep, facilitates a transformation as defined by Suzanne Corkin and Matt Wilson of MIT's Brain and Cognitive Science Department (2007) as “an adaptive change in behavior resulting from experience” or
as Bob Marley puts it, “Who feels it, knows it.”
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